in

A Monster no more? Oakland Hill Country Club is ready for its next major after restoration

A Monster no more? Oakland Hill Country Club is ready for its next major after restoration

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. – When golf course architect Gil Hanse has time to play golf these days, he abides by his three-strike rule.

“If it’s cold, windy and rainy I’m out,” he said. “If it’s two of the three, I’m OK.”

On a warm July summer day near Detroit, Hanse managed to squeeze in nine holes at famed Oakland Hills Country Club, fresh off a $12 million restoration he led with design partner Jim Wagner and onsite coordinator Kye Goalby, son of Masters champion Bob Goalby. With its testing doglegs, sea of sand and some of the trickiest undulating greens, Ben Hogan nicknamed it “the monster.”

Hanse chuckled when asked to reveal his score. He noted that whenever he and Wagner turn up to play one of their courses, the superintendent always picks the hardest flags on the course. Nevertheless, Hanse was pleased with making five bogeys and four pars before Mother Nature intervened. And yet that nine-hole score perfectly illustrates how Hanse has stiffened the test for the better player while making Oakland Hills more playable and therefore more fun for the average golfer.

Players on the practice green during the first round of stroke play of the 2016 U.S. Amateur at Oakland Hills.

Players on the practice green during the first round of stroke play of the 2016 U.S. Amateur…

Source

Subscribe to our Newsletter

The best content delivered directly to your inbox.

80 finalists advance to Augusta National Golf Club for April 2022 competition

80 finalists advance to Augusta National Golf Club for April 2022 competition

Collin Morikawa betting favorite for Zozo Championship’s return to Japan

Collin Morikawa betting favorite for Zozo Championship’s return to Japan